The dish on Foxx and Rogers' DNC convo

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Photo credit: Levine Museum of the New South
  • Photo credit: Levine Museum of the New South

Earlier this week, Mayor Anthony Foxx and Duke Energy's CEO participated in a moderated conversation at the Levine Museum of the New South about the Democratic National Committee's Convention, which will be held in Charlotte in the fall of 2012.

Charlotte magazine's editor was there, and he offered his thoughts on the chat on his blog, Trade & Tryon.

Here's a snippet, but the whole post is worth reading if you're in DNC-watch mode:

• Foxx looked more comfortable than I’ve ever seen him look. He’s really grown into the mayor’s role. Early in his tenure, I thought he often looked a little stiff, with forced smiles and frequent nonanswers. But this morning he was relaxed, candid, funny, thoughtful. At times, Rogers—who layered almost all of his answers with a pronounced strain of boosterism—sounded like more of a politician that Foxx did.

• That said about Rogers, this morning was the first time that I’ve heard someone involved with Charlotte’s DNC effort directly criticize the job Denver did with the 2008 DNC. (Doesn’t mean it hasn’t happened; I just haven’t heard it if it has.) Rogers was there, and he called it a bad experience. I thought I saw a couple members of the local DNC media relations scribbling some notes after that remark.

• Rogers is the moneyman for the convention. It appears as if the fundraising strategy will be to hit corporate donors to support the local committee, and target individuals for the national effort. In fact, the Democratic Party has committed to not accept money from corporations or political action committees, and it has capped individual donations at $100,000. It needs to raise $36 million. I think Rogers and his team will focus on large donors across the country and try to raise that sum with as few people as possible. Though Rogers did make the point that he hopes thousands of people in Charlotte contribute—any amount—because he thinks it’s important to have broad support.

Read the entire post, by Richard Thurmond, here.

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