Childhood obesity = child abuse?

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Thanks to Joe_13 for the pic!
  • Thanks to Joe_13 for the pic!

There comes a point when children will break away from their parents and make their own decisions. Until then, parents, you've got to stop working so hard to appease and befriend your kids and realize that being a parent means molding and shaping your children into healthy, wise adults.

And, that's why I assert if you're the parent of a 100-pound 7-year-old, as the lady in this Associated Press/Charlotte Observer article is (snippet below), you should be charged with child abuse because you are fucking failing as a parent and obviously need an intervention ... for your child's sake.

I further assert that you're part of a giant problem in our society that we refuse to pay attention to, and partially to blame for rising health care costs, drags on government services and more. In other words, get the hell out of our wallets and take control of your household.

Now, take the doughnuts away, invest in some oatmeal (it's cheaper anyway), take away the electronic screens and make your kid play outside. Trust me, after awhile they'll figure out what an imagination is and stop whining. The bonus: When they grow up, they'll thank you.

Yet another obese child came into the doctor's office - 7 years old and over 100 pounds. As he, his mother and his doctor looked at his growth chart, they saw his body mass index soaring over the 97th percentile line. According to his mother his taste runs to junk food; according to his school, it runs away from physical activity.

The child poses two dilemmas. The immediate one is how to help him. That's hard enough: counseling about better food choices, less TV, more physical activity, healthier habits for the whole family and referral to a dietitian.

The second involves the entire community: how to address increasing childhood obesity so the children of the next generation are unencumbered by excess weight and the accompanying problems of sleep apnea, Type 2 diabetes, joint pains, low self-esteem and so on. This dilemma is even harder than the first. But you don't have to read the recent obesity series in the Observer to figure out it's easier for people to avoid gaining the weight in the first place.

Read the rest of the article, by Jessica Saxe, here.

Further reading:

Heart disease costs to triple in U.S. by 2030 — MSNBC.com

Smoking, obesity to blame for lag in U.S. lifespan; U.S. has worse life expectancy than many nations, new report says — MSNBC.com

Rhiannon "Rhi" Bowman is an independent journalist who contributes snarky commentary on Creative Loafing's CLog blog four days a week in addition to writing for several other local media organizations. To learn more, click the links or follow Rhi on Twitter.

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